Diet Quality Score

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #20670
    Poitivient
    Participant

    Hi All,
    I just picked up Matt’s app for DQS. Are there guidelines posted anywhere about what kind of foods fall into what category? My biggest question would be protein supplements or protein bars. And things like zero sugar redbull. Any suggestions?

    #20671
    Matt Fitzgerald
    Keymaster

    DQS Food Categories

    Vegetables

    The vegetable category includes whole, fresh vegetables eaten raw or cooked as well as canned and frozen vegetables and pureed or liquefied vegetables used in soups, sauces, and so forth. Legumes (peas, lentils, etc.) are also counted as vegetables in the DQS. Typical serving sizes of vegetables include a fist-size portion of solid vegetables, one-half cup of tomato sauce, and a medium size bowl of vegetable soup or salad.

    Vegetable juices may be counted either as one-half vegetable serving or as high-quality beverages.

    Fruits that are generally regarded as vegetables for culinary purposes—including tomatoes and avocadoes—may be counted as vegetables.

    A composite food containing more than one type of vegetable may be counted as one-and-a-half or two servings of vegetables. But don’t automatically count such foods as multiple servings. Consider the overall size of the food portion. For example, don’t count a side salad of greens, cucumbers, and carrots as three vegetable servings just because it contains three different vegetables. Count it as one serving.

    A little iceberg lettuce and a thin, pink tomato slice on a hamburger should not be counted as even one-half portion of vegetables. Generous amounts of vegetables on a sandwich may be counted as one-half portion of vegetables.

    Non-fried vegetable snack chips such as kale chips should be counted as high-quality processed foods.

    Plant-based powder supplements such as Greens Plus should be counted as high-quality processed foods.

    Soy products such as soy burgers and other processed foods made entirely or almost entirely from vegetables should be counted as high-quality processed foods.

    Spinach pasta and spinach tortillas should not be scored as vegetables. They should be counted as refined grains.

    When in doubt about whether to count a particular processed or composite food as a vegetable, don’t. Instead count it counted as a high-quality processed food.

    Fruit

    The fruit category includes whole fresh fruits, canned and frozen fruits, cooked whole fruits, blended fruits, dried fruits, and foods made with whole fruits such as apple sauce. Typical serving sizes of fruit include one medium-size piece of whole fruit (e.g. one banana), a handful of berries, and one-half cup of apple sauce.

    Small amounts of fruit included in baked goods, packaged yogurt, etc. should not be counted.

    One hundred percent fruit juice may be counted either as half-servings of fruit or as high-quality beverages. Juice products that are less than 100 percent fruit juice and contain added sugars should be counted as sweets.

    Fruit-based desserts such as peach cobbler may be double-scored as fruits and sweets.

    Fruit-based products such as dried cranberries and applesauce that contain added sugar should be double-scored as fruits and sweets.

    All processed fruit snacks such as Fruit Rollups should be counted as sweets.

    Foods that include multiple fruits, such as smoothies, may be counted as one and a half to two servings of fruit.

    Fruits such as tomatoes and avocadoes that are treated as vegetables in culinary tradition should be counted as vegetables.

    Nuts, Seeds, and Healthy Oils

    The nuts, seeds, and healthy oils category includes cashews, almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds, hempseeds, etc. Peanuts should be counted as nuts although they are technically legumes. Typical serving sizes in this category include a handful of nuts, enough peanut butter to cover a slice of toast, and two tablespoons of salad dressing.

    This category also includes non-chemically extracted plant oils consumed raw or cooked in small amounts. For example, an olive oil-based dressing on a salad is to be counted as a serving of healthy oil, as is grape seed oil used to sauté vegetables.

    Nut and seed butters made without sugar or other additives besides salt should be counted as nuts, seeds, and healthy oils. Those made with added sugar should be counted as sweets.

    Whole Grains

    The whole-grain category includes whole wheat, buckwheat, barley, brown rice, corn, oats, amaranth, quinoa, spelt, bulgur, millet, rye, sorghum, and teff. It also includes breads and other baked goods, pastas, and breakfast cereals made with 100 percent whole grains and no refined grains.

    Whole-bean flours such as garbanzo bean flour may be counted as whole grains even though, technically, they are processed legumes.

    Homemade popcorn counts as a whole grain. (Movie theater popcorn, microwave popcorn, and bagged, ready-to-eat popcorn do not.)

    Typical serving sizes of whole grains include two-slices of bread and a medium-size bowl of breakfast cereal.

    Dairy

    This category includes cow’s milk, goat’s milk, sheep’s milk, cheese, yogurt, sour cream, kefir, cream cheese, and cottage cheese.

    Eaten in small amounts (e.g. a thin pat spread on toast), butter, clarified butter and ghee should not be scored. Eaten in larger amounts (e.g. lobster dipped in melted butter), they should be counted as a heavy sauce and scored in the “Other” category.

    Whole milk, low-fat milk, and skim milk, as well as foods made out of each, are all counted as dairy, but whole-milk dairy products are preferable.

    All sweetened dairy products, including ice cream, frozen yogurt, sweet cream, chocolate milk, and all yogurts containing some form of sugar as their second ingredient should be counted as sweets.

    Non-dairy milk and cheese products (soy milk, rice milk, tofu cheese, etc.) should be counted as high-quality processed foods.

    Typical serving sizes of dairy include the amount of milk you would normally use in a bowl of breakfast cereal, two slices of deli cheese, and a single-serving tub of yogurt.

    Unprocessed Meat and Seafood

    The unprocessed meat and seafood category includes unprocessed skeletal and organ meats from all commonly eaten land animals and the flesh of all commonly eaten sea animals. It also includes eggs. See the subsection on processed meat for a definition of “processed.”

    Refined Grains

    The refined grains category includes white rice, processed flours, and all breakfast cereals, pastas, breads, and other baked goods made with less than 100 percent whole grains.

    Note that, in wheat-containing products, any description other than “whole wheat,” “whole wheat flour,” or “whole grain wheat flour” indicates that the wheat is refined and the product should be counted as a refined grain.

    Breakfast cereals containing more than 10 grams of sugar per serving should be counted as sweets, unless they contain dried fruit.

    Whole-grain baked goods should be counted as sweets if they contain enough sugar to taste sweet.

    Typical serving sizes of refined grains include a fist-size portion of white rice, a medium-size bowl of pasta or breakfast cereal, and two slices of bread.

    Sweets

    The sweets category includes all foods and beverages containing substantial amounts of refined sugars, including candy, pastries, and other desserts.

    Sugary drinks may be scored either as low-quality beverages or as sweets (the point values are the same).

    All food sweetened artificially should be counted as sweets. Artificially sweetened beverages should be counted as low-quality beverages.

    Energy bars and snack bars not made with whole grains, fruit, and/or nuts should be counted as sweets unless consumed during exercise.

    Honey and maple syrup are not counted as sweets unless used in large amounts. Although high in sugar, these are natural, whole foods that have been in a part of the human diet for eons. Agave nectar is marketed as a whole, natural food but is in fact highly processed. It should be counted as a sweet.

    Dark chocolate does not count as a sweet if it’s at least 70 percent cacao and consumed in small amounts of 100 calories or less.

    Breakfast cereals with more than 10 grams of sugar per serving are to be considered sweets unless they contain dried fruit.

    All fruit juices containing added sugar and all processed fruit snacks such as Fruit Rollups should be counted as sweets.

    Yogurt products containing some form of sugar as their second ingredient should be counted as sweets.

    Typical serving sizes of sweets include a slice of pie, a small candy bar, and a 12-ounce can of soda.

    Processed Meat

    The processed meat category includes most forms of meat that have been processed beyond cutting, grinding, and seasoning. It encompasses sausage and other encased meats, most cold cuts, bacon, jerky and other smoked meats, cured meats, corned beef, meat loaf, hot dogs, chicken nuggets, and all fast-food meats except high-quality exceptions such as whole chicken pieces and the Carl’s Jr. All-Natural Burger.

    Animal fats used for cooking, including bacon grease and lard, should be counted as low-quality meats.

    Typical serving sizes of low-quality meat and seafood include one hamburger patty and a palm-size piece of fish.

    Fried Foods

    This fried foods category includes all deep-fried foods such as potato chips, fried chicken, fritters, and donuts.

    Pan-fried, stir-fried, and sautéed foods do not count as fried foods.

    Typical serving sizes of fried foods include a small bag of potato chips and one whole donut.

    Other

    The other category includes the following:

    • All condiments, sauces, dressings and gravies except those that are made from high-quality foods, such as guacamole, hummus, mustard, pesto, and salsa (which may be scored as a one-half portion of the food type they belong to)

    • All non-fried snack chips except those made entirely out of vegetables, such as kale chips

    • All calorie-containing nutritional supplements including protein powders and meal replacements except those made entirely from high-quality foods, such as vegetable powders

    • Any food or beverage you come across that does not easily fit into any of the main food types

    High-Quality Processed Foods

    This category includes all processed foods made entirely or almost entirely from high-quality food sources. Examples are:

    • Non-dairy milk and cheese products (soy milk, rice milk, tofu cheese, etc.)
    • Vegetarian alternatives to meat products made from high-quality food sources such as veggie burgers
    • Energy bars and snack bars made only from high-quality foods such as whole grains, nuts, seeds, and dried fruit.
    • Non-fried vegetable snack chips such as kale chips
    • Supplements made from high-quality food sources such as unsweetened whey protein powder
    • “Diet” foods made from high-quality foods such as Quaker Weight Control Instant Oatmeal

    High-Quality Beverages

    This category includes the following:
    • The first alcohol beverage consumed on a given day
    • 100 percent fruit juice (which may also be scored as one-half serving of fruit)
    • 100 percent vegetable juice (which may also be scored as one-half vegetable serving)
    • Blends of 100 percent fruit and vegetables juices
    • Unsweetened and lightly sweetened coffee and tea

    Milk should be counted as dairy. Non-dairy milks (e.g. soy milk) should be counted as high-quality processed foods.

    Typical serving sizes of high-quality beverages include an 8- to 12-ounce glass of fruit juice and a glass of wine.

    Low-Quality Beverages

    This category includes the following:

    • Sugary drinks (if not counted as sweets)

    • Coffee drinks such as lattes containing more than 50 calories

    • Artificially sweetened beverages

    • Alcoholic beverages after the first

    • Sports drinks if consumed outside of exercise

    Typical serving sizes of low-quality beverages include a 12-ounce can of diet soda and a 16-ounce latte.

    #20672
    Poitivient
    Participant

    Thanks!

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Posted in

Poitivient

You must be logged in to create new topics and to reply to topics.