coachanne

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  • in reply to: Z1 bike workouts for full distance #21436
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Curry,

    Time spent in Zone 1 allows the body to do several things including building endurance, strength, efficiency, and reduces the risk of over training.  Varying the intervals between Z1 and Z2 allows you to stay within the 80/20 intensity balance while gaining fitness and building endurance; Zone 1 allows the HR, pace or power to drop a bit, allowing the body to recover and adapt before bumping up to Zone 2 where there is more strain on the body.

    Hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

     

    in reply to: What’s the best way to do CT and RT Z3? #21435
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Here is a link to the page where you will find all of the important information on testing, etc.  but here is an excerpt from that page that should help:

    Intensity Guidelines for 80/20 Triathlon

     

    “Keeping Your Zones Current

    As your fitness level changes, you will need to adjust your zones to keep them current. Many athletes like to update their zones on a regular schedule. If you wish to do so, choose a preferred testing method and repeat it during every second recovery week beginning with the first recovery week of your plan. Note that recovery weeks fall every third week in all of our cycling plans. Thus, if you elect to perform scheduled testing, you will test in Week 6, Week 12, etc. some but not all of our Cycling Plans include scheduled threshold tests in these weeks. If your plan doesn’t include scheduled threshold tests and you want to insert them, the least disruptive way to do so is to perform them in place of the most challenging workout of the relevant week that features efforts in Zone 3 or higher.

    Also note that if you are an intermediate- or advanced-level cyclist and you use heart rate as your primary intensity metric, you probably don’t need to update your zones very often. This is because LTHR doesn’t change a lot with changes in fitness once you’re past the beginner (or starting-over) phase. What you will find as you gain fitness is that you produce more power at the same heart rates. Indeed, one simple way to update your pace or power zones is to do a test where you ride at your current known LTHR and identify the corresponding power, then plug this number into the appropriate calculator. For example, if you know that your LTHR is consistently stable at 160 BPM but you notice that you’re producing more watts at any given HR lately, do a ride where you lock into a heart rate of 160 BPM and note the corresponding power. Say your power is 250 watts at this HR. This, then, is your approximate FTP. It’s best to do this particular test within the context of a scheduled ride that targets Zone 3.”

    in reply to: What’s the best way to do CT and RT Z3? #21432
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Tedc,

    Perhaps I didn’t fully understand your questions above, so here is a quick breakdown:

    If you are just doing a “normal” training workout, then stay inside the zones.   If you are performing an FTP test, then yes you will be going up and above Zone 3 for your test using the protocol that we have on our site.

    Hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Marathon Bridging 10 weeks #21431
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Craig,

    Yes you are correct, go ahead and use the bridge plan that matches the current level of the plan you are on!

    Hope you get some good recovery time in over the next few weeks!

     

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Transition Week #21427
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Deanlr55,

    The aches and pains of marathon training are something that is inevitable as the mileage ramps up.

    The easiest answer is that following and trusting the plan is key to a successful race.  That being said, stay in the zones set up within your plan, even if that means walking to lower your heart rate when needed.

    A few other things to think about as the miles ramp up:

    How many miles are on your shoes?  Is it time for new shoes?

    How is your nutrition before and after your workouts?

    Are you sleeping enough?

    Are you spending some time to stretch after your workouts?

    All of these things will help with recovery, which will in turn help lessen those aches and pains. Also, remember that if the training plan has become too much in terms of intensity, you can always move to another level!

    I hope that helps but please let me know if you have any other questions!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Marathon Bridging 10 weeks #21426
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Craig,

    Since you are still feeling sluggish, I think the best thing would be to take advantage of some more recovery time.  Adding in some cross training and easier zone 1-2 runs should serve you well through the next 2 weeks, as well as, the normal good sleep, good solid nutrition, etc.  After that, then I would recommend starting the 6 week bridge plan.

    Keep us posted on how that goes!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: What’s the best way to do CT and RT Z3? #21425
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Tedc,

    The great thing about using zones is that you can run or ride within those zone ranges, as long as you are staying within that zone for the prescribed workout.   If you feel great, shoot for the top of the zone, if you are feeling a bit sluggish, go for the bottom end, as long as it’s within Zone 3.  You can also mix things up if you want to, and challenge yourself by pushing the upper limits a bit (while staying within Zone 3) for an interval or 2 and adjusting accordingly.

    I hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Adding Race Two Weeks Later #21424
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Scotty,

    Congratulations on this goal!  Sounds like an amazing time!

    Recovery is such an individualized piece of the puzzle that it’s really hard to provide a straight answer.   That being said, there are some things that can help with your recovery time.  Sleep, good nutrition, stretching and mobility work, etc are all invaluable when you are tackling these distances!

    While this isn’t a definitive “yes” or “no” it may help you think of things that can help with immediate recovery after your first event.  Give it a try, and be sure to let us know how it goes!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: What Zone should I run my IronMan race? #21417
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Latorre,

    Here is a link to a great article that will help answer your question: https://www.8020endurance.com/race-pacing/

    Best of luck at IM Lake Placid!! Be sure to let us know how it goes!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Question about Critical Swim Speed Calculation #21407
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Jarmenia,

    There are so many things that can affect a workout, including fueling, stress, dehydration, heat/ cold, recovery time, workouts/ training load previous to your CSS test… I could go on and on.  Don’t get too caught up in the day to day numbers, but instead look for progress in other areas.   Data isn’t always indicative of progress, therefore we need to find progress in other ways.

    Are you more comfortable in the water than before?  Are finishing a workout feeling better than you were a month or 2 ago?  Are you fixing form issues that you may have had in the past?

    All too often, we as triathletes strictly look to the numbers to make us feel better about progress; when the reality is, we need to focus on our overall mental/ physical strength, and find the small incremental changes that have occurred while we were looking at our Garmin data.

    Hope that helps ease your mind!

    Happy training!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: first time here #21404
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Welcome!   We’re so glad you chose 80/20 to achieve your goals!

    Check out this page to help get your running zones set up: https://www.8020endurance.com/intensity-guidelines-for-8020-running/

    This is also a great page to check out that will help explain how to get started: https://www.8020endurance.com/getting-started-with-80-20-training/

    Hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Vo2max test results… now questions #21401
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Great!  Then you are well on your way to a successful training plan!

    While it can “feel slow” as you approach the new zones, have patience and trust the process.  Very soon you will see your pace increase as your heart rate remains low, as well as not feeling so fatigued after your workouts.

    I hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: Vo2max test results… now questions #21399
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Josh,

    A BQ goal is a great goal to have!   Super excited that you chose 80/20 to get you to that goal!

    The zone model you are explaining above is a different model than what we use at 80/20.  When you set up your zones within TP, make sure you are using the 80/20 zones that include Zone X and Zone Y.

    My other recommendation would to jump on a call with one of our coaches.  Depending on your subscription, you may have a free 30 minute consult available to you, but if not, we are available to walk you through questions you may have!   Here is a link to my page if you are interested in chatting: https://www.8020endurance.com/coach/anne-sharkey/

    Happy training!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: New plan query #21398
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    Congratulations on taking the step in to triathlon!   Exciting times!!

    It does sound like your HR zones are set up correctly using the numbers you have provided.  The metric you use for training is really dependent on you, but if you have access to power for the bike, I would recommend going that direction for your training.

    Have you had the opportunity to chat with any of our coaches yet?  If not, that would be a good place to start so we can help you through your questions setting up zones, etc.

    I hope that helps!

    Coach Anne

    in reply to: IT Band Injury – Ironman A Race in 7 Weeks #21394
    coachanne
    Keymaster

    GrGizmo,

    That’s too bad about the IT issue flaring up!   The IT band is always difficult to treat and certainly requires patience.

    My rule of thumb when someone has to stop running for any number of reasons, is this: We take half of the run mileage and add it to the bike, and take the other half to the pool for aqua jogging.   For example if you have a 10 mile run planned, you would ride the bike (zone 1) for 5 miles and then aqua jog for the same amount of time it would take you to run 5 miles on the road.

    Hope this helps!

    Coach Anne

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 203 total)